Tag Archives: Hiking

Dudley Town

24 Mar

In a forested area near Cornwall, a small town located in the picturesque Litchfield County, Connecticut, there is an abandoned old settlement known to locals as Dudley Town. Although it was never officially considered to be a town, several families lived there in the past. The area was first settled by a Thomas Griffis in the 1740’s, closely followed by several members of the Dudley family, whom the settlement was named for.  Locals claim that Dudley Town is now one of the most haunted abandoned towns in all of New England. Furthermore, it is actually illegal to visit the place, which adds to the mysteriousness of the case.

Location of Dudley Town in Connecticut

Location of Dudley Town in Connecticut

So, what’s with all the legends and secrecy surrounding Dudley Town? It all began when the town was completely abandoned by 1899, and the surrounding forest started to creep back in, leaving the settlement in ruins. Local legend has it that the inhabitants succumbed to some type of ‘madness’, while others died horrible, violent deaths. Also, according to hikers who have visited the place, the woods around the settlement are allegedly eerily silent, with birds and animals refusing to go anywhere near it. Hikers have also reported seeing strange orbs floating around the area.

The road to Dudley Town now

The road to Dudley Town now – By Jeff Belanger

While all of this makes for a good ghost story, historical researchers have found that most accounts of Dudley Town’s ‘haunting’ were simply made up for entertainment. Other less-imaginative hikers have claimed that the forest near the area is perfectly normal, and there are plenty of birds and other wildlife around. The land was most likely abandoned due to the land’s poor location and soil fertility compared with areas much further west. But, why is it illegal to visit the site?

Some of the Dudley Town ruins

Some of the Dudley Town ruins

Trespassers are heavily fined if they are discovered by the police that patrol the area. This makes it seem even more mysterious; why go to so much effort to guard an abandoned town? What are they hiding? The answer is actually simple enough. The land where the settlement ruins stand is now private property belonging to the Dark Entry Forest Association, who have planted many trees in an attempt to create a necessary ecosystem for wildlife, and do not want visitors encroaching on the land and disturbing this ecosystem.

As I said before, the idea that Dudley Town is haunted, with all its previous occupants cursed by some evil spirits, makes for a very good creepy story for people to tell others around a campfire. While there isn’t really any truth to it, I would certainly still like to be able to visit it myself… just to make sure.

What really happened at Dyatlov Pass?

22 Mar

In terms of unexplained incidents throughout history, the ‘Dyatlov Pass Incident’ is probably one of the scariest. To this day, no one is entirely sure exactly what happened that fateful night, but there are a few theories. So, for those who haven’t heard of it, what exactly was the Dyatlov Pass Incident?

In February 1959, ten Russian ski hikers, most of them university students, decided to trek across the northern Ural Mountains together. They were led by Igor Dyatlov (the mountain pass in question is now named after him). One of the hikers had to return home due to illness, and it was lucky that he did, because he would be the only group member to make it home alive. The group was expected to make contact with their sports club once they had returned to Vizhai, a far-north Russian town. When nothing was heard from them for an extended period of time, friends and relatives began to worry, and a rescue operation consisting of students and teachers was dispatched. Not long after that, the police and military became involved. On February 26th, the hiker’s tent was discovered on the eastern shoulder of a mountain, now ominously known as Kholat Syakhl (Mountain of the Dead).

The hiker's tent as it appeared on the day it was found - 26th February, 1959

The hiker’s tent as it appeared on the day it was found – 26th February, 1959

The tent appeared to have been cut open from the inside, and all the hiker’s belongings were still in it, including their shoes. This probably meant that something had caused them to flee in the middle of the night, without even stopping to put their footwear on despite the intense cold. Footprints, made by sets of both barefoot and sock-clad feet were found, and these footprints headed down the mountain to the other side of the pass, where there was a forested area. Unfortunately, after a short distance the footprint trail was covered in too much snow to be of any more use.

On the edge of the forest, the rescue operation found evidence of a campfire, along with the bodies of two of the hikers. They were barefoot and clad in only their underwear. Not far from these bodies, three more bodies were found, and all looked as if they had been heading back towards the camp. The other four hiker’s bodies were not found for several more weeks, as they were buried under a few metres of snow in a nearby ravine. They were dressed in more clothes than the others, and it looked like they had taken clothes from the previous five after they had died, in an attempt to keep themselves warm.

Medical inquests found that six of the hikers had died of hypothermia, and the other three had sustained fatal injuries; one had a crushed skull and the other two had chest fractures. The chest fractures were said to have been caused by some kind of massive pressure, akin to the force generated by a car accident. Strangely, one of them was also missing a tongue. Whilst it was initially suspected that they may have been killed by local indigenous Mansi people, there was no evidence of any other people having been in the area at the time. Along with this, the medical report claimed that humans couldn’t possibly cause the kind of damage seen on the victims, stating instead that the hikers had died from a ‘compelling natural force’.

There were other more controversial claims about the case:

1.)    Apparently, forensic tests also showed high levels of radioactive contamination on the hiker’s clothing.

2.)    An attendee at the hiker’s funerals stated that their skin seemed to have a ‘deep tan’

3.)    Some people who had also been hiking in the area came forward to claim that on the night that the incident occurred, they saw orange glowing spheres in the sky (later found to be missile launches)

4.)    Others claimed that there was a big military accident cover-up going on, as evidenced by the large amount of scrap metal in the area.

5.)    The reports on the incident were allegedly hidden by the government and revealed only in the 1990’s, with parts still hidden.

These more controversial claims have generally been dismissed; however, the actual cause of the incident is still unknown. Many people have posited the theory that an avalanche was responsible. This makes a lot of sense; the hikers may have been awoken by the sound of an approaching avalanche, cut the tent open and ran as fast as they could, not even bothering to take shoes or clothes with them in their hurry to escape. Being hit by an avalanche could also explain the massive force exerted on the three hikers who sustained fatal physical injuries, and even the missing tongue. However, an avalanche would probably have covered the footprints leading away from the tent, but they were still highly visible. There was also no avalanche damage seen in the area.

avalanche

Avalanche – Courtesy of Scientif38

Thus, no one is entirely sure what happened to these poor hikers. I think that what may have occurred is this: they were all asleep, and awoken by the sound of the missile launches or perhaps a plane passing overhead. Sleepily mistaking the sound for the booming of an impending avalanche, they cut the tent open and raced away as quickly as they could. Once they realized that there was no avalanche, they started to make their way back to their camp, but by this stage six had perished from hypothermia due to the exposure to the freezing elements. This explains why three of the bodies were found in various stages of making their way back to the tent. The other four took their clothes to keep warm, and ended up falling into the ravine that they were later found in. The heavy fall could explain the bodily trauma. As for the missing tongue, it’s possible that an animal could have scavenged it, especially seeing as the bodies were lying in the open for quite some time before being discovered.

Of course, this is just my speculation. For all I know, some other terrifying ‘compelling force’ may have scared the hikers into running away in the middle of the night, and this ‘force’ may have been responsible for the massive trauma found on three of the bodies.

So, did something sinister cause this incident, or is there a logical explanation? Anyone with their own ideas or theories is welcome to comment below. For more information and some (quite gruesome) photos associated with the incident, check out http://www.ermaktravel.com/Europe/Russia/Cholat-%20Syachil/Kholat%20Syakhl.htm

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